Category Archives: Public Health

New Salmonella Dublin test for milk and cattle available for first time in US

Salmonella can cause serious disease on cattle farms, killing calves, causing cows to abort, contaminating raw milk, and harming humans along the way. While the cattle-adapted strain Salmonella Dublin creeps into the Northeastern US, veterinarians and farmers struggle to catch the bacteria in time to protect livestock because these bacteria often hide dormant in carrier animals, making the strain particularly hard to diagnose.

For the first time in the US, a more useful test for Salmonella Dublin is now available exclusively at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC). Cheaper, quicker, safer, and more sensitive, the test detects antibodies rather than bacteria. Traditional bacteriological tests could only identify S. Dublin organisms in sick or deceased animals, missing up to 85% of infections in carrier cattle. The new test reveals carriers, helping farmers and veterinarians monitor infection spread over time and track the impact of control measures in ways that were previously impossible.

Dairy-cows-Pavement“We’re very concerned about this disease spreading east because it could severely harm animal and human health, as well as the livelihoods of dairies in the region,” said Dr. Belinda Thompson, senior extension associate at the AHDC. “Salmonella Dublin is already common west of the Mississippi River, but it’s only recently being recognized in the Northeastern US. We want to be pro-active now to keep it out of our farms.”

In recent years the AHDC has dealt with several high-morbidity and high-mortality outbreaks of Salmonella Dublin in New York and other states. To address the problem before it grows further, Dr. Bettina Wagner, director of the Serology and Immunology Section of the AHDC laboratory, secured the nation’s first USDA permit to import and use the enhanced test.

While Salmonella Dublin usually doesn’t make adults cows very sick, it can wreak havoc on young and unborn calves, particularly in populations like those in the East Coast that haven’t been exposed. Its resistance to many common antibiotics severely limits treatment options and, to make matters even worse, it often presents as respiratory disease, throwing off track veterinarians trained to recognize diarrhea as salmonella’s telltale sign.

“Infected calves often look fine the day before a sudden rapid onset, the next day they look depressed, and the next day they die,” said Dr. Paul Virkler, senior extension associate at the AHDC. “Veterinarians often think it’s something else-. We’ve seen newly infected herds in which every single calf in a particular age group dies. We’re trying to keep this from getting to baby calves, the life and future of a farm, and the animals most at risk.”

People working with cattle are also at risk. All Salmonella strains affect most vertebrates and can jump between species. Even carriers that don’t seem sick can shed bacteria, and people, companion animals, and other livestock can pick up the infection through contact with any bodily excretion.

“People have died drinking raw milk with Salmonella Dublin,” said Virkler. “It’s one of the bad players in raw milk. Pasteurizing milk will kill the bacteria.”
Prior to the new test’s release, testing had to be done animal by animal. The new antibody test can use milk samples straight from bulk milk tanks to find whether a herd has been exposed. It can also work with blood samples and diagnose individuals, helping keep unexposed herds infection-free by removing infected animals and pre-screening new animals farmers are considering buying.

“Herd managers can take preventative measures and help control the infection’s spread by isolating sick calves, pasteurizing milk, managing cattle movement, and improving hygiene,” said Thompson. “But to see if any of this is working, they need a tool to monitor success. We didn’t have that until now. This test will let us learn about the prevalence of Salmonella Dublin on the East Coast and hopefully nip it in the bud.”
cows in field

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http://vet.cornell.edu/news/Dublin.cfm

Media Hits:

Cornell Chronicle

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Oct12/SalmonellaDublin.html

Meat Trade News Daily

http://www.meattradenewsdaily.co.uk/news/291112/usa___a_lack_of_understanding_over_salmonella_.aspx

MyScience

http://www.myscience.us/wire/cornell_offers_only_u_s_salmonella_dublin_test_for_cattle-2012-cornell

The Post Standard: Syracuse.com

http://blog.syracuse.com/farms/2012/11/better_test_for_cattle_disease.html

Phys.org

http://phys.org/news/2012-11-cornell-salmonella-dublin-cattle.html

Drovers CattleNetwork.com

http://www.cattlenetwork.com/cattle-news/Cornell-offers-only-US-salmonella-dublin-test-for-cattle-176821551.html?ref=551

Bovine Veterinarian Online

http://www.bovinevetonline.com/news/industry/Cornell-offers-only-US-salmonella-dublin-test-for-cattle-176821551.html

USAgNet

http://www.usagnet.com/story-national.php?Id=2486&yr=2012

Dairy Herd Network

http://www.dairyherd.com/dairy-news/latest/Cornell-offers-only-US-salmonella-dublin-test-for-cattle-176821551.html

Food Safety News

http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/11/cornells-new-test-spots-salmonella-in-cattle/

Ithaca Journal

http://www.theithacajournal.com/article/20121111/NEWS01/311110027/Cornell-test-detects-salmonella-cattle?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|p

Before It’s News

http://beforeitsnews.com/food-and-farming/2012/11/cornells-new-test-spots-salmonella-in-cattle-2446024.html

Healthy Cooking News

http://healthycookingnews.blogspot.com/2012/11/cornells-new-test-spots-salmonella-in.html

Beef Cattle News

http://savant7.com/beefcattlenews/

Stop Foodborne Illness

http://www.stopfoodborneillness.org/content/cornell%E2%80%99s-new-test-spots-salmonella-cattle

MeatingPlace

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:lnLu6SjDDeMJ:www.meatingplace.com/Industry/News/Details/37578+&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

Highbeam Business

http://business.highbeam.com/409224/article-1G1-310739927/cornell-offers-new-salmonella-test-cattle

CABI.org VetMed Resource

http://www.cabi.org/VetMedBeta/news/22617

The Meat Site

http://www.themeatsite.com/meatnews/19365/cornell-offers-us-salmonella-dublin-test-for-cattle

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Ticks untold

Prime suspects in mystery fevers may hold new tick-borne diseases
Suddenly your horse is sick and you don’t know why. She breathes normally but her temperature is rising, her eyes grow yellow with jaundice, she seems depressed, and barely eats. The fever is clear but the cause is not; even the most experienced experts can offer no concrete answers. Eventually the fever fades, but is that the end of whatever caused it or is the source still lurking somewhere inside?

Horse owners across the states are facing this distressing scenario. At the Cornell University Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC), Dr. Linda Mittel fields a growing number of calls about these mysterious fevers of unknown origins (FUOs). Many come from the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Great Lakes areas: the nation’s topmost hotbeds of human tick-borne disease. This pattern led Mittel to suspect that the culprits of the fever caper could be ticks and the difficult-to-diagnose diseases they carry.

“Tick-borne diseases are some of the fastest growing emerging diseases in the United States right now,” said Mittel. “As ticks continue expanding their numbers and geographic range these diseases may affect new areas. We get calls about fevers at broodmare operations, showbarns, and farms where race horses rest or layup, even in areas where they didn’t know they had ticks. But horses moving between states can move ticks with them, and the effects of this movement are starting to show.”

Mittel and colleagues at the AHDC are embarking on a project to find just what diseases ticks in hotbed zones are carrying and whether they are behind the wash of mystery fevers in horses. The study will use samples from horses suffering FUOs to look for bacterial infections known to be transmitted by ticks (Anaplasma, Babesia, Borrelia, Ehrlichia, and Rickettsia) as well as other bacteria known to cause non-respiratory infection in horses (Leptospira, Bartonella, and Neorickettsia.)

These agents are considered emerging infectious diseases in humans, and this will be the first study determining their presence in horses with FUOs. The study will also sample ticks found on or near horses in designated areas to find which pathogens they carry and to potentially discover previously undocumented tick-borne pathogens.

Many tick-borne diseases are sensitive to specific drugs; others are not sensitive to antibiotics at all. Knowing which diseases are at the root of FUOs will help veterinarians treat them effectively. It will also help owners understand how the causes of fevers might impact affected horses’ futures in racing, performance, or showmanship.

“I’m quite excited to start solving the mysteries of these fevers and to possibly uncover new previously unrecognized diseases – in horses and people,” said Mittel. “If these agents are in the horses, humans may also have them without realizing– people who work with these horses might be particularly at risk. Knowing what we’re dealing with here will hopefully solve the mystery of FUOs and help equine and human medicine recognize and address the growing onslaught of tick-borne disease.”

This research is funded by the Harry M. Zweig Memorial Fund for Equine Research.

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Study shows drinking ‘raw’ milk puts farmworkers, babies, and others at higher disease risk

Nov. 8, 2011

By Carly Hodes

Will a fresh glass of “raw” milk nourish or poison you? Pasteurization almost always provides protection from contamination. Unpasteurized “raw” milk, on the other hand, provides a potential breeding ground for disease-causing bacteria such as E. coli, Listeria, Campylobacter and Salmonella, all of which have caused outbreaks spread by raw milk in the past year, said Ynte Schukken, professor of epidemiology and herd health at Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

researcher Ynte Schukken with dairy cows

Dr. Ynte Schukken, professor of epidemiology and herd health, with livestock.

He has co-authored a paper in the August issue of the Journal of Food Production quantifying the risk of contracting Listeria monocytogenes from raw milk. In collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agriculture Research Service and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, the four-year project of graduate student Alejandra Latorre produced a comprehensive map showing which populations were most at risk when buying from various sources.

“Listeria is one of the most virulent and deadly foodborne pathogens,” said Schukken. “Our study demonstrates the relative risk various populations face when ingesting raw milk, including farmworkers, pregnant women, young babies and the elderly. Compared to intermediate-aged adults, these last three groups were particularly susceptible.”

The researchers analyzed risk across various purchasing methods including buying from a farm’s on-site store, directly from its bulk tank or from a third-party retailer. “Raw milk from retailers proved most dangerous by far. But when it comes to milk, the safest purchasing decision you can make is to buy it pasteurized,” Schukken said.

Despite its dangers, 28 states permit the sale of raw milk. Enthusiasts claim health benefits from nutritious compounds supposedly destroyed by pasteurization.

“These claims are not backed by scientific evidence, and several studies have shown them to be myths,” said Schukken. “Pasteurization helped revolutionize health, effectively ending diseases such as tuberculosis and Q fever. Bypassing this safety measure could have serious consequences for public health, dramatically increasing bacterial infection and outbreaks.”

Other tips to minimize risk, says Schukken: “Make sure the farm is a legal raw milk farm participating in a testing program. Only buy what you can finish in a week, keep it cold in your fridge, and use it quickly.”

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Media Hits:

Cornell Chronicle

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Nov11/RawMilk.html

Medical Xpress (PhysOrg)

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-11-raw-poses-groups.html

MyScience

http://www.myscience.us/wire/drinking_raw_milk_puts_farmworkers_babies_and_others_at_higher_disease_risk-2011-cornell

Minnesota Ag Connection

http://www.minnesotaagconnection.com/story-national.php?Id=2396&yr=2011

UPI

http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2011/11/19/Raw-milk-puts-babies-farm-workers-at-risk/UPI-75531321743525/?spt=hs&or=hn

Western Farm Press

http://westernfarmpress.com/management/running-risks-raw-milk-food-safety-blunder

Real Raw Milk Facts

http://www.realrawmilkfacts.com/raw-milk-news/story/cornell-drinking-raw-milk-puts-farmworkers-babies-and-others-at-higher-dise/

Public Opinion Online

http://www.publicopiniononline.com/living/ci_19445503

Bites

http://bites.ksu.edu/news/151355/11/11/09/us-running-risks-raw-milk-food-safety-blunder

Southwest Farm Press

http://southwestfarmpress.com/livestock/running-risks-raw-milk-food-safety-blunder

Student’s Fulbright project tackles potential epidemics in Trinidad and Tobago

pFrom the stray-strewn streets of Trinidad and Tobago to cow-covered pastures of rural New York dairy farms, Miguella Paula-Ann Mark-Carew has journeyed far in her quest to understand and combat disease epidemics across the world. Ever since she came to Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine through a veterinary summer program when she was 17, Mark-Carew wanted to return as a full-time student. While attending Dartmouth College, she spent two respective summers  conducting epidemiological research with Drs. Paul Bowser and Ted Clarke, and her positive experiences with Cornell faculty further sealed her aspiration. In 2007 she came to Cornell’s College of Veterinary Medicine as a doctoral student in the field of comparative biomedical sciences.

An aspiring epidemiologist, Mark-Carew studies Giardia parasite infections at the group and population levels to help understand and control potential epidemics. Giardia protozoa infect the small intestine of humans and other animals, causing stomach pain, diarrhea, bloating, fever, nausea, and vomiting for two to four weeks. It commonly spreads via water contaminated by raw sewage or animal wastes. It can also spread between individuals, quickly putting populations at risk. Mark-Carew’s Giardia studies took her from the New York Watershed to the islands of Trinidad and Tobago to study the parasite’s prevalence and genetic makeup in dairy cattle and other mammals.

tr
After receiving a Fulbright grant funding an independent epidemiological project, Mark-Carew returned to the Caribbean state of Trinidad and Tobago to take on a growing health concern facing her family’s homeland. Her Fulbright project involves efforts to quantify, manage, and control the population of thousands of stray and free-roaming dogs in streets across the country. These dogs can carry Giardia and other diseases humans can catch, posing a serious potential public health risk, according to Mark-Carew. Beyond its medical and epidemiological significance, the project involves sociological surveys with political potential. Mark-Carew interviews residents and tourists about their perspectives on several concerns, including stray dog issues, testing to identify parasites, and the value of continuing her efforts to count the number of strays, all with the hope of inspiring policy changes to address the stray problem.

“I adopted three puppies when they were a month old from an active dog abandonment site,” Mark-Carew mentioned. “One is with me now in Ithaca, and the other two are scheduled to fly home with me after my visit this coming January. I literally brought my work home with me!”

 

Other Projects

Mark-Carew has also been involved with a project called “Caring Collars Loving Leashes” that was started by her mother, Marlene Mark, to promote the human-animal bond.

“We encourage owners to walk their dogs and obtain ID tags for free collars we give out so they can find their dogs if they get lost,” said Mark-Carew. “Over 150 collar and leash sets were split between the two branches of the Trinidad and Tobago Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (TTSPCA). We’d like for it to be an annual campaign during May, National Pet Month in the US.”

 

Inspired by a talk Mark-Carew gave at Cornell about her project, five Cornell students have visited Trinidad and Tobago to lend a hand. Sophie Tilitz, a rising freshman undergraduate interested in animal science, helped for six weeks from February to April 2011. In January 2011, second-year veterinary student Jasmine Bruno and third-year students Sarrah Kaye, Erin Lashnits, and Sarah Dumas spent two weeks on the islands with Mark-Carew collecting parasite samples from dogs, cattle, and water buffalo, processing samples in the lab, counting roaming dogs in the streets, and volunteering in an intensive marathon spaying and neutering event.

(Read more about their adventures.)

 

Future Plans

Mark-Carew hopes her career will allow her to assist the World Health Organization or similar entities to navigate an increasingly globalized world through which pathogens can spread quicker than ever before. She aims to understand how diseases differ across the world and species and hopes to work on projects concerning public health and animal health, particularly dealing with waterborne diseases in developing countries.

“I plan to return to Trinidad and Tobago during January 2012 break and Summer 2012,” said Mark-Carew. “This project means a lot to me and I plan to devote several years to seeing that something is done to control roaming dogs and promote responsible dog ownership in Trinidad and Tobago. I am looking for additional Cornell students to help with the roaming dog assessment project, and can be reached at mpm26@cornell.edu.”

 

For more on Mark-Carew’s Fulbright project, visit her blog: http://halfbrightfulbright.blogspot.com/

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http://www.vet.cornell.edu/news/carew.cfm